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EPW018998 ENGLAND (1927). The Turn Lee Paper Mills, Glossop, 1927

© Hawlfraint cyfranwyr OpenStreetMap a thrwyddedwyd gan yr OpenStreetMap Foundation. 2019. Trwyddedir y gartograffeg fel CC BY-SA.

Delweddau cyfagos (6)

EPW018998
  0° 0m
EPW019003
  71° 41m
EPW019002
  132° 55m
EPW018999
  112° 84m
EPW018997
  142° 89m
EPW019000
  126° 108m

Manylion

Pennawd [EPW018998] The Turn Lee Paper Mills, Glossop, 1927
Cyfeirnod EPW018998
Dyddiad July-1927
Dolen
Enw lle GLOSSOP
Plwyf
Ardal
Gwlad ENGLAND
Dwyreiniad / Gogleddiad 403217, 393115
Hydred / Lledred -1.9515717863793, 53.434549355887
Cyfeirnod Grid Cenedlaethol SK032931

Pinnau

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Cyfraniadau Grŵp





Paper was being manufactured at Dinting paperworks, to the west of Glossop, by 1835, the mill having been built as a cotton spinning mill in the early 1800s. By the 1860s there were at least two more in the area (Schmoller 1994).

Manufacture initially used rags, straw, jute and esparto (Anon 1936). A number of successive owners had gone bankrupt in the paper-making business; however, two empty paper mills at Whitfield were taken over by manufacturers from Bury to develop a new paper-making process. Experiments were successful and expansion began in 1882 to devel op the large paper-making complex known as Turn Lee Mills (SMR 6146; Hanmer & Winterbottom 1991)

http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-881...

See also http://www.glossopheritage.co.uk/turnlee.htm

Chris
Wednesday 24th of December 2014 05:34:03 PM
Paper was being manufactured at Dinting paperworks, to the west of Glossop, by 1835, the mill having been built as a cotton spinning mill in the early 1800s. By the 1860s there were at least two more in the area (Schmoller 1994).

Manufacture initially used rags, straw, jute and esparto (Anon 1936). A number of successive owners had gone bankrupt in the paper-making business; however, two empty paper mills at Whitfield were taken over by manufacturers from Bury to develop a new paper-making process. Experiments were successful and expansion began in 1882 to devel op the large paper-making complex known as Turn Lee Mills (SMR 6146; Hanmer & Winterbottom 1991)

http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-881-1/dissemination/pdf/EUS_Texts/Glossop/Glossop.pdf

See also http://www.glossopheritage.co.uk/turnlee.htm

Chris
Wednesday 24th of December 2014 05:32:55 PM