EPW026639 ENGLAND (1929). The Tunnel Portland Cement Works, West Thurrock, 1929

© Copyright OpenStreetMap contributors and licensed by the OpenStreetMap Foundation. 2020. Cartography is licensed as CC BY-SA.

Nearby Images (34)

EPW026639
  0° 0m
EPW032826
  337° 23m
EPW046466
  12° 28m
EPW057044
  3° 30m
EPW032825
  178° 31m
EPW039476
  215° 35m
EPW046462
  19° 35m
EPW039470
  20° 36m
EPW057047
  23° 37m
EPW026640
  307° 41m
EPW039471
  297° 47m
EPW046467
  30° 48m
EPW039475
  276° 55m
EPW046464
  211° 55m
EPW057055
  100° 62m
EPW057050
  76° 63m
EPW046468
  41° 65m
EPW039473
  20° 72m
EPW057046
  70° 78m
EPW057052
  38° 79m
EPW057054
  64° 80m
EPW026644
  339° 82m
EPW057043
  61° 85m
EPW039472
  178° 88m
EPW057051
  187° 88m
EPW057048
  76° 89m
EPW057053
  59° 89m
EPW039474
  357° 109m
EPW046469
  87° 122m
EPW046470
  96° 122m
EPW046463
  324° 131m
EPW057045
  125° 144m
EPW057049
  47° 150m
EPW046465
  358° 180m

Details

Title [EPW026639] The Tunnel Portland Cement Works, West Thurrock, 1929
Reference EPW026639
Date May-1929
Link
Place name WEST THURROCK
Parish
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 557668, 177953
Longitude / Latitude 0.2707162898094, 51.478045233798
National Grid Reference TQ577780

Pins

cement silos, packing and loading

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:39:59 AM
clinker stockpile

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:39:21 AM

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:38:23 AM
old cement mill house

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:37:47 AM

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:36:49 AM
kiln feed mixers

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:36:19 AM

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:35:41 AM

User Comment Contributions

The West Thurrock Plant of the Tunnel Portland Cement Company Ltd. The Tunnel name was derived from Tunnel Farm, which still stood at this time, on the top of the quarry face off-frame to the left. The plant began in a small way in 1874, but became much more significant when it was acquired by the Danish firm F L Smidth in 1911, when it was rebuilt on up-to-date lines and rapidly expanded. By the time of the photograph, the plant was in a period of transition, with many new features at the planning stage. The original two rotary kilns had increased to four, and a further three were installed before WWII. By 1938 it was the largest British plant, and remained so until 1970. It closed in 1976.



This gives a good view of the rear of the newly-installed Kiln 4, which was a new departure in kiln design, with long spans between tyres. It was similar in design to the kilns installed at the time at Hope and at Ketton.



The clinker stockpile can be seen: it has spilled over onto disused rail tracks in the foreground. The gantry that originally conveyed clinker across the rail tracks has been taken down, and shortly after this, the stockpile and the area to the left was turned into a large stockyard with overhead cranes. Successive cement mills were then installed in the left foreground.



The power house was already out of use, the plant having been connected to the Barking electricity distribution system: grid supply was not yet operational.



Trains of chalk wagons can be seen lined up, brought from the quarry to the left for feeding to the washmills. Until 1927, the clay had been brought up from the wharf to the right, but now clay was fed to the washmills in slurry form from one of the mixer tanks. The slurry was made at Aveley, and pumped 2.3 km to the plant.

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 09:59:45 AM