EAW031120 ENGLAND (1950). SS Chitral on the Thames by the Town Pier, Gravesend, 1950

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Nearby Images (4)

EAW031120
  0° 0m
EAW031119
  331° 97m
EPW032058
  307° 132m
EAW031122
  137° 182m

Details

Title [EAW031120] SS Chitral on the Thames by the Town Pier, Gravesend, 1950
Reference EAW031120
Date 19-July-1950
Link
Place name GRAVESEND
Parish
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 564790, 174816
Longitude / Latitude 0.37173168762143, 51.447829727301
National Grid Reference TQ648748

Pins

The Royal Clarendon Hotel

Kentishman
Wednesday 9th of March 2016 03:48:03 PM
The Pier Hotel

Kentishman
Wednesday 9th of March 2016 03:46:17 PM
A pontoon bridge across the tidal Thames was built from Clarendon Lawn, Gravesend, to near Tilbury Fort in Essex. Information about the bridge is sparse and contradictory. The 'Discover Gravesham' council website (http://www.discovergravesham.co.uk/gravesend-chronology/1910-1916.html ) states that it was built in 1914 using 70 lighters (a shallow barge for loading and unloading ships) but was dismantled after a few months. 'Tilbury and Chadwell Memories' (http://www.tilburyandchadwellmemories.org.uk/page/the_tilbury_to_gravesend_pontoon_bridge_1915-1918 ) gives more detail and states that the pontoon was in place from 1915 to 1918, using 67 lighters. The BBC 'World War One at Home' site ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0232hsx ) gives dates of 15th November 1914 until the end of the war. Details provided and several images on Google show that there were two carriage ways with a total width of about 20 feet. There was also a removable section of about 600 feet to allow shipping through - the Thames was one of the busiest, if not he busiest, river for shipping in the World at this time.

Kentishman
Wednesday 9th of March 2016 03:34:06 PM
The Grand Theatre,, Harmer Street. Built 1842 as the Literary Institution, it became the Prince of Wales Theatre of Varieties in 1884 and then the Grand theatre Palace of Varieties in 1900. Closed 1933, except for the bar, the roof collapsed in 1955 and it was replaced by the Call Boy public house. ('Discover Gravesham' web site)

Kentishman
Monday 1st of December 2014 06:38:54 AM
Gravesend railway station.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:37:56 PM
This looks like a sight screen in the Bat and Ball cricket ground.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:34:11 PM
Gravesend Borough Police Station. On the other side of this building, masked from view, is the Borough Fire Station.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:32:25 PM
Windmill Hill.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:28:50 PM
Mid Kent Golf Club, established 1909.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:27:24 PM
The Three Daws PH

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:17:44 PM
Back of the Majestic cinema.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:16:30 PM
Gravesend market.

Kentishman
Thursday 3rd of July 2014 05:15:20 PM

User Comment Contributions

This image shows the site of the southern end of a pontoon bridge erected across the Thames during WW1 to aid the movement of troops.



A pontoon bridge across the tidal Thames was built from Clarendon Lawn, Gravesend, to near Tilbury Fort in Essex. Information about the bridge is sparse and contradictory. The 'Discover Gravesham' council website (http://www.discovergravesham.co.uk/gravesend-chronology/1910-1916.html ) states that it was built in 1914 using 70 lighters (a shallow barge for loading and unloading ships) but was dismantled after a few months. 'Tilbury and Chadwell Memories' (http://www.tilburyandchadwellmemories.org.uk/page/the_tilbury_to_gravesend_pontoon_bridge_1915-1918 ) gives more detail and states that the pontoon was in place from 1915 to 1918, using 67 lighters. The BBC 'World War One at Home' site ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0232hsx ) gives dates of 15th November 1914 until the end of the war.

Details provided and several images on Google show that there were two carriage ways with a total width of about 20 feet. There was also a removable section of about 600 feet to allow shipping through - the Thames was one of the busiest, if not he busiest, river for shipping in the World at this time.

Kentishman
Sunday 21st of August 2016 12:15:15 AM