WPW044805 WALES (1934) [Unlocated]. View of a ship in dry dock, Newport, oblique aerial view. 5"x4" black and white glass plate negative.

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Details

Title [WPW044805] View of a ship in dry dock, Newport, oblique aerial view. 5"x4" black and white glass plate negative.
Reference WPW044805
Date 1934
Link Coflein Archive Item 6369803
Place name
Parish
District
Country WALES
Easting / Northing 0, 0
Longitude / Latitude -7.556448482059, 49.766185796754
National Grid Reference SV000000

Pins


MB
Sunday 14th of October 2012 09:42:03 AM
Bucket dredgers

MB
Sunday 14th of October 2012 09:40:10 AM

User Comment Contributions

This Bailey's dry dock Newport with the second dry dock owned by the dock company alongside.



The dry dock with the ship is not a lock, but I think it may have started life as an entrance to the docks from the river Usk, but I may be wrong on this as there are three possible sites still in existance for the entrance lock.



The new lock when built was one of the longest in the UK over 1000 ft long with extra gate to reduce length when required.

Louis
Thursday 19th of July 2012 12:02:51 PM
Surely the vessel is in the lock that maintains the high level of the enclosed dock compared to the tidal fluctuations of the River Usk. The tide is out and the (wet) dock is high. It is called a ‘wet dock’ because it always had water in it, rather the than the ships sitting on their bottoms at low water. A dry dock would have been ‘blind’ at one end and would have probably had rather more working space. Good examples can be found in the collection of aerial pictures of Falmouth Docks.

Maurice
Friday 13th of July 2012 08:57:15 AM


This is an aerial photograph of the Alexandra Dock. The Transporter Bridge, on the bend of the river carried workers over the River Usk to the Lysaghts Steelworks on the right of the photo. Coronation Park is also this side of the River, below the Steelworks. On the distant left of the photo is the inlet or pill known as Pillgwennly and the entrance to the Old Town Dock.

willtap
Friday 13th of July 2012 12:46:17 AM