SPW049795 SCOTLAND (1936). 
Queen Mary, River Clyde, Bowling. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing north-east.


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    Details

    Title [SPW049795] Queen Mary, River Clyde, Bowling. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing north-east.
    Reference SPW049795
    Date 1936
    Canmore Collection item 1257795
    Place name
    Parish OLD KILPATRICK (DUMBARTON)
    District DUMBARTON
    Region
    Country SCOTLAND
    Easting / Northing 243764,  673496
    Longitude / Latitude -4.5010389516981,  55.929144959149
    National Grid Reference NS438735
    Image size (px)
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    Pins (1)

     Queen Mary sailed on her maiden voyage on 27 May 1936 and captured the Blue Riband in August of that year; she lost the title to SS Normandie in 1937 and recaptured it in 1938. With the outbreak of World War II, she was converted into a troopship and ferried Allied soldiers for the duration of the war. Following the war, Queen Mary was refitted for passenger service and along with Queen Elizabeth commenced the two-ship transatlantic passenger service for which the two ships were initially built. The two ships dominated the transatlantic passenger transportation market until the dawn of the jet age in the late 1950s. By the mid-1960s Queen Mary was ageing and though still among the most popular transatlantic liners, was operating at a loss. After several years of decreased profits for Cunard Line, Queen Mary was officially retired from service in 1967. She left Southampton for the last time on 31 October 1967 and sailed to the port of Long Beach, California, United States, where she remains permanently moored. Much of the machinery including two of the four steam turbines, three of the four propellers, and all of the boilers were removed, and the ship now serves as a tourist attraction featuring restaurants, a museum, and hotel. The ship is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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    Allen T
    Sunday 28th of October 2012 11:28:01 PM
    Now a hotel, visitor attraction and conference centre in Long Beach, California the grandeur of the great transatlantic liners is still visible in the sumptuous if now dated furnishings and fittings.

    Report as Inappropriate

    Allen T
    Sunday 28th of October 2012 11:32:33 PM