EAW001084 ENGLAND (1946). The fire-damaged Kirkby Inland Storage Depot of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, Bickerstaffe, from the north-east, 1946

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Nearby Images (2)

EAW001084
  0° 0m
EAW001086
  319° 77m

Details

Title [EAW001084] The fire-damaged Kirkby Inland Storage Depot of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, Bickerstaffe, from the north-east, 1946
Reference EAW001084
Date 3-June-1946
Link
Place name BICKERSTAFFE
Parish SIMONSWOOD
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 343596, 400850
Longitude / Latitude -2.850434563591, 53.501067983147
National Grid Reference SD436009

Pins

simonswood signal box

austin
Wednesday 7th of April 2021 08:40:37 PM
St Chad's church

Pentaprism
Monday 9th of November 2020 09:59:11 PM
old water tower {hence towerhill }

austin
Thursday 17th of September 2020 10:12:13 AM
Farmers Arms Pub (old) Kirkby

Skier
Monday 20th of July 2020 03:43:29 PM
E.W.S Emergency water supply ,depleted slighty , probably used during the fire etc.

Martynj
Friday 13th of May 2016 03:28:04 AM
The industrial skyline of Liverpool.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:48:06 AM
Cook house/canteen block?

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:45:39 AM
Platform or loading bank. This is very well connected to the mainline with several cross overs. Was this used to provide a train service for those working on the site?

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:43:15 AM

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:13:12 AM

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:13:07 AM
Railway line to the Royal Ordnance Factory No. 7 Kirkby, 1940-46. This is described as a filling factory (i.e. filling munitions) that employed 20,000 employees. In 1946 it was purchased by Liverpool City Council and converted to a Trading Estate - The Knowsley Trading Estate. The 1955-56 OS map still shows the railway connection and many of the array of small buildings surrounded by blast embankments of the old munitions factory, although some parts are clearly 'converted' to civilian use. Today it is a concentration of most large modern factory/warehouse buildings.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 07:57:01 AM
Are these accommodation blocks for the staff of the storage complex? Probably military personnel.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 07:04:48 AM
There are a number of turnouts (points or switches) in this part of the depot that appear to be built on closely laid and light coloured sleepers. Are these early concrete points? They also appear to use flat bottom rail, as suggested by the absence of chairs. They appear to be made up of very short sections of rail, suggesting prefabrication. This one's neighbour is of a more conventional construction.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 07:00:49 AM
Loop for weighbridge siding - see EAW001080. Weighbridges were always 'looped' as engines were not allowed to run over them.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:52:44 AM

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:46:17 AM

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:45:48 AM
The track design of this depot is interesting. Most British freight yards followed the traditional 'one ended' pattern with all sidings ending in buffer stops, even for sorting sidings. Here we find what might be described as the 'continental' (i.e. European or North American) pattern of a yard that can be run into from either end with sidings that are all loops including those around the warehouses. It clearly took a war for us to adopt a more efficient way of setting out a freight yard. But this was all rather too late for the efficient handling of rail freight it being another twenty years before the first 'run through' Freightliner and Merry-go-round depots were commissioned.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:35:20 AM
Infact the GC had adopted this style of through yard for some of their later yards e.g. Wath, Grimsby and Mottram. Toton as upgraded by the Midland had through "balloon loops" for sorting and receiving traffic.

bescotbeast
Sunday 22nd of September 2013 12:26:04 PM
The track is laid with sleepers formed of concrete blocks with steel ties between them. This type of track was found in many rapidly set up railway sidings constructed during the 1939-45 war.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:27:40 AM
There appears to have been two separate fires.... this one also involving a building and a row of parked road vehicles.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:22:01 AM
Steam locomotive servicing point; water crane, coaling stage and ash pit between the rails.

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 06:20:34 AM
fire damaged compressors

bescotbeast
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 03:42:26 AM
fire damaged Willys Jeeps

bescotbeast
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 03:40:23 AM
LMS Type 13 ARP design signal box.

bescotbeast
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 03:27:58 AM
Short siding within its own compound

MB
Monday 16th of September 2013 11:52:14 PM
Road entrance with guard house

MB
Monday 16th of September 2013 11:50:53 PM

User Comment Contributions

Thank you for your help with this picture - the caption will be updated to reflect the identification of the building.



Best wishes

Laura Maddison

(Britain from Above Cataloguer)

Laura Maddison
Wednesday 21st of May 2014 09:59:22 AM
General Comments: -



Firstly this is recorded on the 1955 OS map as 'Kirkby Inland Sorting Depot'. It is mostly still intact at that date and the outline of the burnt out buildings seems to suggest they may have been rebuilt. By 1955 the number of railway tracks is somewhat reduced.



Secondly, why was it there?



Answer One - The 'Inland' part of the title suggests it was related to the Port of Liverpool, this being a safer and more spacious place to sort and store material that had arrived on the Atlantic convoys. Many of the conveys arrived in Liverpool, it being considered a safer approach than the English Channel. Much of the war materials would than be forwarded to southern England in preparation for D day and despatch from Southampton to France.



Answer Two - Just out of this picture to the left is the Royal Ordnance Factory (ROF) No.7 Kirkby 1940-46 that employed 20,000 people. Clearly such an operation would have generated a large amount of the railway traffic and the ROF is connected to the sorting sidings, seen here, by one side of a triangular junction. Between this site and the water tower to the rear of this picture, and next to the wood called the Old Rough, the map shows an 'Industrial Hostel'. This was for the women workers in the ROF.



These extra details can be seen on 'Old Maps' (http://www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html), Kirkby or at coordinates 342070, 400170 - 1955-56.

Maurice
Sunday 22nd of September 2013 01:15:29 PM
In answer to your answer one I'd already commented on the role of this location at 03:45 and put a newspaper clipping found via Google within my comment regarding the fire in 1946.

bescotbeast
Sunday 22nd of September 2013 01:15:29 PM
One of the references I searched on this one stated that nearby Bickerstaffe was a centre for Quakerism in earlier times. One wonders what these peaceful souls would have made of all this activity in support of war?

Maurice
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 08:50:54 AM
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2507&dat=19460415&id=PkxAAAAAIBAJ&sjid=r4wMAAAAIBAJ&pg=3091,5721224

Kirkby Inland sorting depot, warehouses used by the Mersey Docks and Harbours board for storage. This would have been used to enable cargo from ships to be stored safely away from the bombing of the docks.

bescotbeast
Tuesday 17th of September 2013 03:45:01 AM
A World War II government supply depot, judging by the extensive site. It may be associated with a nearby Royal Ordnance factory and ammunition bunkers at Rainford

MB
Monday 16th of September 2013 11:54:26 PM